13 results found
WBG   |  
St. Lucia: Climate Change Policy Assessment

St. Lucia has been a leader among vulnerable Caribbean states in prioritizing a response to climate change, both nationally and in international fora. Its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) outlines a balanced mitigation strategy backed by costed investment plans, and a qualitative adaptation strategy with identified priority sectors. This paper takes stock of St. Lucia’s plans to manage climate change, from the perspective of their macroeconomic implications.

Category:  Fiscal Instruments for Climate Policy, Macroeconomics of Climate Change, Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management, Public Financial Management

PMR   |  
Partnership for Market Readiness

Published in November 2017, the PMR technical note, Establishing Scaled-up Crediting Program Baselines under the Paris Agreement: Issues and Options, offers guidance and identifies options for developing baselines for scaled-up crediting programs under the Paris Agreement



Category:  Fiscal Instruments for Climate Policy, Distribution, Competitiveness & Political Economy, Macroeconomics of Climate Change, Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management, Climate Finance, Public Financial Management
GIZ, IMF, UNEP   |  
Green Fiscal Policy Network

The Green Fiscal Policy Network is a joint partnership between UN Environment (UNEP), the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) launched in 2011. The Network aims to facilitate knowledge sharing and dialogue on green fiscal policy reforms.

Category:  Fiscal Instruments for Climate Policy, Distribution, Competitiveness & Political Economy, Macroeconomics of Climate Change, Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management, Climate Finance, Public Financial Management

OECD   |  
Climate Change Adaptation and Financial Protection: Synthesis of Key Findings from Colombia and Senegal.

Developing countries are disproportionately affected by the rising trend of losses from climate-related extreme events. These losses are projected to continue to increase in future, driven by climate change and the accumulation of people and assets in high-risk areas. Effective climate change policies are needed to reduce the accumulation of risk, combined with instruments and tools to help retain, share or transfer financial losses if an extreme event occurs.

Category:  Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

WBG, OECD   |  
Managing Disaster Risk Related Contingent Liabilities in Public Finance Frameworks, OECD Working Papers on Public Governance, No 27

Natural disasters have caused, and continue to cause, a significant amount of economic costs. The costs of disasters are often, and to a large extent, shouldered by governments, especially in economies where private insurance markets are not well developed. Governments are asked to provide financing for explicit commitments made prior to a disaster, and are often under pressure to make payments for which no such commitments were made earlier.

Category:  Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

  |  
Disaster Risk Management and Fiscal Policy: Entry Points for Finance Ministries.

This chapter reflects on the benefits of disaster risk management (DRM) in the context of fiscal policy and public investment. Of particular interest is the question of how those in charge of fiscal policy decisions can recognise and realise the economic and broader benefits of DRM. We consider the interplay between public DRM investment and fiscal policy and provide an overview of current debate as well as assessment methods, tools and policy options.

Category:  Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

U.S. Office of Management and Budget   |  
Climate Change: The Fiscal Risks Facing The Federal Government: A Preliminary Assessment.

Climate change is already affecting communities across the United States. This report outlines the contours of fiscal risk through five program-specific assessments: crop insurance, health care, wildfire suppression, hurricane-related disaster relief, and Federal facility flood risk. These programs were assessed because they are directly influenced by climate change, they have strong links to the Federal Budget, and quantitative scientific and economic models regarding the likely magnitude of impacts were available.

Category:  Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

IMF   |  
Analyzing and Managing Fiscal Risks: Best Practices.

This paper provides a set of analytical tools and best practices to help policy makers understand and manage fiscal risks. Rather than seeking to provide an alternative to standard debt sustainability analysis, the paper’s focus is on how countries can assess and manage fiscal risks more broadly—including tail risks—and to better incorporate uncertainty into fiscal policy analysis. The paper is structured as follows.

Category:  Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

WBG, GFDRR   |  
The Indirect Cost of Natural Disasters and an Economic Definition of Macroeconomic Resilience (2015)

The paper proposes a rule of thumb to estimate macroeconomic resilience, based on the interest rate (a higher interest rate decreases resilience and increases welfare losses), the reconstruction duration (a longer reconstruction duration increases welfare losses), and a “ripple-effect” factor that increases or decreases immediate losses (negative if enough idle resources are available to cope; positive if cross-sector and supply-chain issues impair the production of non-affected capital).

Category:  Macroeconomics of Climate Change, Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management

WBG   |  
Economic Resilience Definition and Measurement (2014)

The (economic) welfare disaster risk in a country can be reduced by reducing the exposure or vulnerability of people and assets (reducing asset losses), increasing macroeconomic resilience (reducing aggregate consumption losses for a given level of asset losses), or increasing microeconomic resilience (reducing welfare losses for a given level of aggregate consumption losses). The paper proposes rules of thumb to estimate macroeconomic and microeconomic resilience based on the relevant parameters in the economy.

Category:  Macroeconomics of Climate Change, Climate Change Fiscal Risk Assessments and Management